Step 1: Speed Test

Determine if your slow speed is an issue with a wired or wireless connection.

Run a wired speed test. Use an Ethernet cord to connect your computer to your modem and then run a speed test. If your wired speed test results are also slow (below 70% of what you expect), troubleshoot your wired connection first. If your wired speed test results are good, then you know the slow speeds are likely due to an issue with your wireless connection.

Step 2: Check Your Network

Make sure that the Ethernet cables are securely plugged in.

  • The internet LED on the router is on if the Ethernet cable connecting the wireless router and the modem is plugged in securely and the modem and router are turned on.
  • If a powered-on computer is connected to the router by an Ethernet cable, the LAN LED should be on.

Your router will have your network name and password recorded on a sticker on the bottom or side of the router.

  1. Network Name (SSID)
  2. Network Key (WiFi Password)
If your router doesn't have your network name and password listed on the bottom or side of the router, you can get help finding your WiFi Name and Password   .

You can check the following factors that may influence your WiFi speeds:

  • Competing Devices: The more devices that are sharing your Internet connection, the more bandwidth each is competing to use. Try disconnecting some of your devices that aren't in use to improve performance on other devices.
  • Competing Networks: Your computer can check to see if there are other wireless networks in the area that may be competing with you for bandwidth.
  • Distance from Your Router: Your best signal is within about 125 feet within line of sight. Try moving your device closer to see if your speeds improve.
  • Signal Obstacles: Your router needs to be in the most central spot in your home, and away from anything that might block its signal.
  • Time of Day: If you're experiencing slow speeds during peak use times (generally 5-9 PM), check your speeds during a non-peak hour to see if they improve.
  • Other Sources of Interference: If you can, move your WiFi devices away from other transmitting devices, such as baby monitors, cell phones and Bluetooth devices, or turn them off when not in use.

Step 3: Check Your Equipment

  • Check to make sure that your wireless device is compatible with the network that you selected (2.4 GHz or 5 GHz).
  • By default, In-home WiFi is set to WPA2 encryption. Some older wireless devices (e.g. USB wireless adapters and wireless adapter cards) may not support WPA2 encryption. If a wireless device doesn't support WPA2, it won;t be able to join your wireless network.
  • If you have an older wireless device that does not support WPA2 you can change the Security Option from WPA2-PSK [AES] to WPA-PSK [TKIP] + WPA2-PSK [AES].

Can't Sign in to Router

If you're unable to sign in to your router from a computer on your local network, check the following:

  • If you're using an Ethernet-connected computer, check the Ethernet connection between the computer and the router.
  • Make sure that your computer's IP address is on the same subnet as the router. If you are using the recommended addressing scheme, your computer's address should be in the range of 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.254.
  • If your computer's IP address is shown as 169.254.x.x, recent versions of Windows and MacOS will generate and assign an IP address if the computer cannot reach a DHCP server. These auto-generated addresses are in the range of 169.254.x.x. If your IP address is in this range, check the connection from the computer to the router, and reboot your computer.
  • If your router's IP address was changed and you don't know the current IP address, clear the router's configuration to factory defaults.
  • Make sure that your browser has Java, JavaScript, or ActiveX enabled. If you're using Internet Explorer, refresh your browser to be sure that the Java applet is loaded.
  • Try quitting the browser and launching it again.
  • Make sure that you're using the correct sign in information. Make sure that Caps Lock is off when you enter this information.

Many connection issues can be solved by restarting (power cycling) your network. Run our troubleshooting tool, which will reset your modem. You may also be able to use it to reset your router:

Troubleshoot

Or follow the steps below:

  1. Unplug the modem.
  2. Turn off the router and computers and/or mobile devices.
  3. Plug in the modem. Wait two minutes.
  4. Turn on the router and wait two minutes.
  5. Turn on the computers and/or mobile devices.

Learn more about restarting your network   .

Step 4: Check Your Security Settings

If all of your devices are experiencing slow speeds, check your network's security settings. Consider using Security Suite to manage your security settings.

For more information and troubleshooting tips for your router, consult its user manual.